Friday, April 29, 2011

Carrot Mango Souffle

When I first got married, I used to make a carrot soufflé, often and it was one of our favorites.  I don’t remember the recipe except that it called for beaten egg whites and they terrified me, completely.  Fortunately, we do get the opportunity to further our expertise in cooking and now, I can beat egg whites, without trembling.

As I think about it, it must have been a big deal for me to make this dish and conquer, momentarily my fear of separating eggs and beating the whites.  I was one of those newly marrieds who knew nothing about cooking and before you say, “Me too,” keep in mind, I did not know how to make instant coffee or spaghetti (plain).  I know my Mom cooked but I have no memories of us bonding over a mixing bowl or a hot flame.  

When my oldest daughter was young, I always baked with her and her friends and wondered about those mothers who did not.  One day, it hit me; this was my rebellion against my mother.  She did nothing wrong but I felt rejected.

It was similar to the first grade reading experience.  Evidently, I was an advanced reader in those primary years.  My first grade teacher separated me from the class to read books to myself while she taught the rest of the class how to read.  I resented this.  I felt lonely, in my corner of the room, sitting by a table filled with books and no one to share the experience with.

It is interesting how I responded to this as a teacher.  One year, my fourth grade class had one very bright fifth grader, in the class.  The school was a new one and the highest grade was the fourth but the parents of this child wanted her, in this school.  As a private school, they were able to accommodate her.
This was a setting for individual work for the child but I did not want to isolate her.  Fortunately, she was very bright and grasped new concepts easily.  I was able to “backwards mainstream” her into the fourth grade, giving her more difficult math problems, in the same area of study.  The other subjects were easy to handle.  I included her in all topics, always raising the standards for the young lady.  If we read in American history, she got a more challenging reading selection, on the same topic.

After having experience my loneliness, I could not do it to her.  I could not isolate her from the class who were her friends.  I have never regretted this and I am pretty sure, she has not either.  This married woman with children, to this day, tells me stories of that year, always with gratitude.
When it comes to the children, I have taught over the years, I could write books. Often, I think of starting a blog about teaching.  As a former principal of many years, I chose to go back to the classroom because that is where I receive and give the most.  There is nothing more rewarding than being in the actual classroom, the entire teaching day.

Administration has its rewards but nothing like teaching, in my opinion.
Now for the teacher who cooks and bakes…….  Here is my carrot soufflé. Note no egg whites………

Carrot Soufflé   adapted from Allrecipes
Ingredients:
Chop mango.
1 pound carrots, chopped
1 mango, chopped
1/2 cup oil
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 eggs
3 tablespoons brown rice flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup white sugar

Method:
  Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Lightly grease a 
2 quart casserole dish. 

    Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.

    Add carrots and cook until tender, 15 to 20 minutes.

   Place carrot, mango, oil, eggs, and vanilla into food processor.
   
When blended, add dry ingredients.

   Process until the batter is smooth. 


    Pour into baking pan and bake for 45 minutes.


     Enjoy!
Before Baking

The Finished Product





   

  

3 comments:

  1. Carrot souffle sounds too good. I will try.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Amazing! I'm in love with this dish already :), Miriam@Meatless Meals For Meat Eaters

    ReplyDelete
  3. Your carrot souffle sounds lovely especially with the mango -and I love that you don't have to separate the egg whites!

    ReplyDelete

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